Grafisch Ontwerp

The Vendor Client Relationship

Ça fait déjà plusieurs mois que je me questionne sur ma relation avec le monde du design et ce qu’elle implique comme types de projets (certains qui vont à l’encontre de mes valeurs), compromis, stress, etc. Cette bonne blague, presque réaliste, s’applique à l’argent, oui, mais aussi aux propositions présentées à certains clients. Voilà pourquoi je commence à m’essouffler.

Publié dans la catégorie Design, le 6 August 2009

4 réponses à The Vendor Client Relationship

  1. Par Christine Prefontaine 

    le 6 August 2009 à 22:31

    This is so true that it’s frightening. The shift of perspective makes it clear what happens. Somehow ways of interacting that people would never consider in relation to products are somehow fine with services. As if there are no costs. I love the end with the chef!

  2. Par Christine Prefontaine (prefontaine) 's status on Friday, 07-Aug-09 03:33:05 UTC - Identi.ca 

    le 6 August 2009 à 22:33

    […] http://blog.marieclaudedoyon.com/the-vendor-client-relationship/ […]

  3. Par Robert B 

    le 7 August 2009 à 14:39

    I agree in part that it seems totally incredible that people would act this way in real life, yet that “clients” ask us on a regular basis to give them discounts, or somehow do not believe that there are fixed costs (overhead and such) with running a business, which have to covered, or else you’re losing money.

    However, this is also an area for opportunity, if one understand where the break-even point exists in a business to cover fixed costs, and where any contribution to overhead is going to the bottom line. If the client is going to cover your marginal costs in the transaction (associated with that haircut or job), and you have something left over towards covering overhead, you are ahead of the game. But be careful not to do this over and over — you have to figure out which clients are going to cover all your fixed costs during the year, so that you can afford a few discount clients who will turn into permanent and loyal customers (paying their full fare over time). The moral is: you can make it up in volume, but someone has to pay the piper first.

  4. Par CL 

    le 5 October 2009 à 18:41

    I agree in part that it seems totally incredible that people would act this way in real life, yet that “clients” ask us on a regular basis to give them discounts, or somehow do not believe that there are fixed costs (overhead and such) with running a business, which have to covered, or else you’re losing money.

    However, this is also an area for opportunity, if one understand where the break-even point exists in a business to cover fixed costs, and where any contribution to overhead is going to the bottom line. If the client is going to cover your marginal costs in the transaction (associated with that haircut or job), and you have something left over towards covering overhead, you are ahead of the game. But be careful not to do this over and over — you have to figure out which clients are going to cover all your fixed costs during the year, so that you can afford a few discount clients who will turn into permanent and loyal customers (paying their full fare over time). The moral is: you can make it up in volume, but someone has to pay the piper first.

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